Sealion War

We had a great event this past weekend.

I was running the Arts and Sciences competition and competing in the rapier war.  Upon arriving I talked to a friend of mine, Lord Kerry, who is one of Baroness Caitrin’s Sergants.  We were talking about my heavy armour being almost done, and he offered to loan me the extra pieces.  So I agreed, picked up my armour and we were good to go.  The Heavy war was up first on the saturday.

I had a blast as a pikeman.  I have a few favorite moments from the heavy war.  The first one was when I hit a friend of mine in the stomach during the bridge battle; it was a friend of mine who is also a fencer.  My next great moment was fighting beside Baron while we fought another knight and a few more.  Another great moment was towards the end of the last battle.  We had essentially won victory and were mopping up the last of the Segirtians when I saw their Baron Ming.  He was legged and the only other fighters near us were archers.  I called out for single combat with him.  I managed to stay alive for about two minutes, which was more than I, or anyone else expected.  A knight took my place and slew the baron.

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Spice Blends

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Here are three common spice blends that I’ve made over the years.  It’s not that hard to create your own version.  Most versions have the same ingredients in differing quantities.

Grains of paradise can be difficult to come by.  I use a combination of cardamom and pepper to get a similar taste.  If you live in the US it’s a bit easier to come by than in Canada, though I don’t know why that is.

Galingale is fairly easy to come by, as long as you don’t mind using the South-East Asian version of the spice.  The version which is native to Europe has not been cultivated in several hundred years.

Powder Douce:

Source: Janet Hinson’s translation of Le Ménagier de Paris

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Apple Pie

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Source

To make pies of greene Apples.
Take your Apples and pare them
cleane, and core them as ye wil a quince
then make your coffin after this man-
ner, take a litle fayre water, and halfe
a fishe of butter, and a litle Saffron,
and set all this upon a chafindyshe, tyll
it bee hote, than temper your flower
with this sayd licour, and the white of
two egges, & also make your coffin and
season your Apples with Cinamon,
Ginger and Sugar inough. Then put
them into your coffin, and bake them.

A Proper New Booke of Cookery 1575

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May 12 practice

Yay, Abbotsford practice is up and running.  I wasn’t able to stay for long at practice this week, but I will be in the future.  I was able to practice my lunges, and am getting better at them.  I did some sparing, focusing pretty much solely on lunges.  So I was trying to work with spotting holes in guards and attacking them.  I had some success with disengages after the initial forward movement, and before Read more…

A&S 50 part II

This brings me up to date with my competition projects.  I have two more posts to be put up soon, one to do with an apple pie I made last week, and one to do with spice blends.  But both of these will be aimed directly at the A&S 50 rather than for other competitions.  I have several competitions coming up this year and I will continue to upload my research to this site. If Read more…

Baked Venison: Fresh and Preserved

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This was done for the Barony of Lions Gate A&S Defenders competition in February 2010.  The competition was that your entry had to be related to your persona, and you needed one page of documentation to show that.  I made Baked Venison and Cameline Sauce.  I made two kinds of Baked Venison, one with salted venison and one with fresh.  I served them with a cameline sauce.  Here are the highlights of my entry:

Source

Venison

When looking for a baked venison, or venison pie, recipe I found seven different recipes, sometimes from the same cookbook, spanning from 1393 till 1596.  I have arranged them in order with my commentary here.

DEER VENISON. As this meat is tougher than fawn or goat, it must be parboiled and larded all along it: and in cooking, it must be put in plenty of wine, and when partly cooked, ground mace added; and it must be eaten with cameline. – Item, in pastry, let it be parboiled, larded along its length, and eaten cold with cameline. (Pichon)

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Examination of Medieval Sauces

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In August of 2009 I subjected my friends to my attempts at Cameline sauce (a sort of cinnamon based dipping sauce for meat), and Mustard.  I needed more practice with documentation and wrote this up as if it were for a competition.

15th Century Cameline Sauce

This recipe is from “Two Fifteenth Century Cookery-books: About 1430-1450” by Thomas Austin. I first found this recipe as the basis of Daniel Meyers’ Cameline sauce (Meyers). Instead of following his version of this (which was more of an amalgamation of several different Cameline recipes) I followed the given recipe.

Source

Sauce gamelyne. Take faire brede, and kutte it, and take vinegre and wyne, & stepe þe brede therein,
and drawe hit thorgh a streynour with powder of canel, and drawe hit twies or thries til hit be smoth;
and þen take pouder of ginger, Sugur, and pouder of cloues, and cast þerto a litul saffron and let hit be
thik ynogh, and thenne serue hit forthe. (Austin)

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Tart of Prunes

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This was done for the A&S competition at Lionsdale Champions in June 2009.  The competition was “Rhymes with June”.  My lady Kayleigh deLeis and I did this together.  We won the competition.

Recipe

Original source

The recipe we chose was from A Proper newe Booke of Cokerye which was published in 1557 in England.  It is for a dessert tart made with prunes.  We found a second source in The Good Huswifes Jewell, published in 1596 in England which we used to add a bit of spice to our adaptation.

To make short paest for tarte.
Take fyne floure and a cursey of
fayre water and a dysche of swete butter and
a lyttel saffron, and the yolckes of two egges
and make it thynne and as tender as ye
maye.

To make a tarte of Prunes.
Take prunes and set them upon a chafer
wyth a little red wyne and putte therto a
manshet and let them boyle together, then
drawe them thorowe a streyner with the
yolkes of foure egges and season it up wyth
suger and so bake it.
(Frere)

To make Tarte of Prunes.
Put your prunes into a pot, and put in
red wine or claret wine and a little faire,
water, and stirre them now and then, and
when they be boyled enough, put them into
a bowle, and straine them with sugar, synamon
and ginger.
(The Good Huswifes Jewell)

Modern Translation